Deeper Water by Robert Whitlow

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Robert Whitlow, a practicing attorney in Georgia, has written a legal thriller series, The Tides of Truth, with Deeper Water as the first novel. This series is now complete with the second and third titles being Greater Love and Higher Hope. He has been mentioned as Christian fiction’s John Grisham.

In this first book in the series, Whitlow shares the deep spiritual convictions of law student, Tammy Lynn Taylor, who wins a summer internship in Savannah and ventures far from her protective homeschooled family to experience the challenges of big city law. She is given a case involving a poor fisherman arrested for tying his johnboat to private docks every night. This seemingly simple case for an intern becomes much more complicated and sinister leading Tammy to suspect collusion between senior law partners in a young child’s death. Tammy’s strong convictions generating from a deeply religious family shine through in every situation and are an enlightening aspect of Whitlow’s novels.

Robert Whitlow is also the author of Jimmy, the subject of the previous blog post.

JIMMY by Robert Whitlow

>Jimmy is an ordinary story with extraordinary happenings. Because of Jimmy’s handicap, some of his accomplishments are what might be considered trivial to others. Yet, Mr. Whitlow pulls the reader into each situation Jimmy faces; his fears, trials and his victories. I just wanted to be Jimmy’s friend as I read through this book. The relationships that are built between Jimmy, his parents, his grandfather, his dog and other characters throughout the story are strong and endearing. I would consider this book a gentle read with a little suspense built in.

As They See ‘Em by Bruce Weber

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One of the fun aspects of baseball is the larger-than-life personalities, yet those who do their best to preserve the integrity of the game prefer it if we don’t notice them at all. As They See ‘Em by Bruce Weber is the story of umpires, including the controversies, the hints, and the training. Weber attended Jim Evans Academy of Professional Umpiring and crossed the country interviewing umpires to get the inside story. He reveals the unique talents required, the difficult living conditions, and the ability to shrug off insults along with anecdotes about difficult calls and difficult players and managers. As They See ‘Em presents a new perspective on America’s game.

Slow Fire by Ken Mercer

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Slow Fire tells the story of Will Magowan, a former narcotics officer who was fired after becoming addicted to heroin during his deep undercover activities. After spending time in rehab and with no other job prospects, he accepts the position of police chief in a remote area of Northern California, in a town that appears on the surface to be idyllic. After his arrival, he quickly is involved in a murder, recognizes that many of the citizens display the appearance and behavior of meth addiction, and finds evidence of a large meth lab somewhere in the forested area surrounding the town. The community is uncooperative and refuses to help him in his investigations. Magowan is an interesting character, trying to cope with past tragedies, an impending divorce and his desire to rid the community of it’s meth problems. Ken Mercer’s debut novel is fast-paced with a well-drawn, many dimensional main character and an interesting cast of characters–I look forward to more by this author.

House Rules by Jodi Picoult

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Asperger’s Syndrome, an autism spectrum developmental disorder in children, is a theme in Jodi Picoult’s newest book, House Rules. In an interview regarding her choice of topics Jodi shared that a cousin of her’s is autistic, and had become violent in a number of situations when his frustrations were beyond his control. The police had been called several times and he could not communicate his problems. Jodi could see how the legal system breaks down for those who are unable to express their innocence.

Picoult is known for her extensive research into her book topics and this was indeed the case with House Rules. She interviewed six teenagers with Aspergers and their parents and also had thirty-five families answer lengthy questionnaires regarding their reactions to situations, their lives, their hopes and frustrations. Jodi put many of their direct experiences in this book. She has created a riveting story around the Asperger theme. What happens when a murder is committed and someone with extreme communication and developmental issuses is accused? How do police, wardens, judges and lawyers deal with someone that refuses to communicate and appears guilty because of his disabilities? Does our legal system handle such individuals fairly. Jodi Picoult gives us much to ponder.

Shattered by Karen Robards

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Karen Robards comes through with another sizzling romantic suspense novel with her latest book “Shattered”. Lisa Grant is an attorney who returns home to Kentucky to care for her ailing mother. She finds a job as a research assistant for District Attorney Scott Buchanan, a childhood neighbor who did odd jobs for her wealthy family. When Lisa is assigned to a cold case file where she bears a striking resemblance to a missing family member, she attempts to unravel the mystery of the photograph, only to find an attempt being made on her life. The chemistry between Lisa and Scott grows as the mystery deepens—the mystery is intriguing and the characters likable. Robards is a master at combining romantic tension and a suspenseful plot creating an entertaining read!!

Vision in White by Nora Roberts

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Mackensie is enjoying her dream job as a wedding photographer, working with her three best friends from childhood in a wedding planning business. She enjoys her single life, absorbed in her work hiding behind the camera. But when tweed-wearing, Shakespeare quoting Carter Maguire literally stumbles into her life, she begins to wonder if maybe she wouldn’t like something more. Vision in White is the first installment in Nora Roberts’ Bride Quartet series. Roberts starts off with a bang with smart protagonists, winning dialogue, and a bit of spice.